Aeschylus: Persae by Aeschylus

By Aeschylus

Aeschylus' Persae, first produced in 472 BC, is the oldest surviving Greek tragedy. it's also the single extant Greek tragedy that bargains, no longer with a mythological topic, yet with an occasion of modern background, the Greek defeat of the Persians at Salamis in 480 BC. in contrast to Aeschylus' different surviving performs, it's it sounds as if no longer a part of a attached trilogy. during this new version A. F. Garvie encourages the reader to evaluate the Persae by itself phrases as a drama. it's not a patriotic party, or a play with a political manifesto, yet a real tragedy, which, faraway from providing an easy ethical of hybris punished via the gods, poses questions bearing on human discomfort to which there aren't any effortless solutions. In his advent Garvie defends the play's constitution opposed to its critics, and considers its kind, the potential for thematic hyperlinks among it and the opposite performs offered by means of Aeschylus at the comparable celebration, its staging, and the country of the transmitted textual content. The remark develops in better aspect a few of the conclusions of the advent.

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Aeschylus: Persae

Aeschylus' Persae, first produced in 472 BC, is the oldest surviving Greek tragedy. it's also the one extant Greek tragedy that bargains, now not with a mythological topic, yet with an occasion of contemporary background, the Greek defeat of the Persians at Salamis in 480 BC. not like Aeschylus' different surviving performs, it really is it seems that no longer a part of a hooked up trilogy.

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Webster, Greek theatre production (London 1956) 8 (also 104, 165), Arnott passim, Kierdorf 53–5. 108 Taplin 452–9. g. Smethurst 107 n. 50 (also CW 87 (1993) 13–20), Scullion, Three studies 69–70. 109 H. D. F. Kitto, Form and meaning in drama (London 1956) 31; see Taplin 458–9, Garvie, Choephori xlvi–xlvii. 110 Pöhlmann, ‘Proedrie’ 53 and ‘Chor’ 64, Bees 90. 107 Staging xlvii orchestra terrace-wall,111 this is perhaps an exaggeration. But certainly the existence of a skene would make this easier.

Smethurst, CW 87 (1993) 17 (for whom, however, the council-chamber is not visible to the audience), Rosenbloom 48–9, 77, 113. 117 Taplin 454, and earlier HSPh 76 (1972) 66–9. But see, against him, Librán Moreno, ‘La skené’ 66–7. I do not understand the idea of Dale (Collected papers 140–9, 262), a believer in a visible skene, that, when the Chorus sits on the steps outside the skene, it is meant to be inside it. Staging xlix Stagecraft 456), makes out a reasonable case for Aeschylus’ Myrmidones being set inside the klisia of Achilles at Troy.

But certainly the existence of a skene would make this easier. 112 Bethe (followed by Conradt–Schiller 7–9) envisaged a simple building without a door, which served as a background to the action; similarly Pöhlmann, Proedrie, for whom the great innovation in the Oresteia was the doors, which for the first time allowed the skene to be used as part of the action; see also Rehm, ‘Staging’ 281 n. 77. Sommerstein, Aeschylean tragedy 34–5, envisages a screen symbolizing a building, while for Belloni the building is simply a building, and we should not attempt to identify it too precisely.

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